Why the government should stop gun toting protestors from encamping government buildings

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Photo by Jen Theodore on Unsplash

Amendment II of the US Constitution, generally referred to as the “Right to bear arms” amendment, is a concise one-sentence paragraph containing, one would presume under the circumstances, twenty-six carefully chosen words:

“A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.”

The Constitution, which laid out the three branches of government and their respective powers and duties, was ratified on September 17, 1787. Two years later, James Madison proposed the language in the Second Amendment. …


Honey get your gun, the rebels are coming

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Photo by Chris Chow on Unsplash

Let’s face the truth. The Second Civil War (CW2) just got underway. It had been brewing underground, in chat rooms, and on social media sites for much of this century. The first skirmish of CW2 started when insurgents, commanded by their Commander-in-Chief, the disgruntled sitting President of the USA, ordered them to march down to the capitol and stop the certification of the November General Election results.

The rumbling of CW2 has gone unnoticed, covered up, and spun to put a glossy public relations spin on the trouble with white men. These troubled Americans and the women who love them began to intensify their resistance to American elections and democracy when President Barack H. Obama started to form a perfect union. …


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Nationalist gathered at the Georgia State Capitol in 2012 protesting gun control legislation. Photo the writer

“They always get away!”

The day after the not guilty verdict came in from the George Zimmerman case back in 2012 for the murder of Trayvon Martin, a friend from college called me with a teary voice. She cried: “White people always getaway; they always getaway.”

While I attempted to console her by saying we are a nation of laws, and justice, in the end, will prevail, I knew in my heart from my own life experiences that she was right. “They always get away.”

They get away with the murder of Black people with impunity, of this one thing, Black people are wise. You can add insurrection to the list of things that white people, unlike Black people, can do without facing legal consequences. …


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Photo by Unseen Histories on Unsplash A young John Lewis

The nation moaned and groaned, “Come on Georgia.” It became a rallying cry in the Senate runoff races because the outcome of the Georgia contest to seat two senators in the US Congress not only impacted the State of Georgia, but it also had national and international implications as well.

And boy, oh boy, did Georgia come through. She elected two senators on the same ballot for the first time in the history of the constitution. …


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Southern Christian Leadership Conference hold news conference the day before Senate run-off race in Georgia. Photo by writer

One day before the US Senate run-off in Georgia and the Democrats have the “Big Mo.” Momentum is on their side. In what is expected to be two close races to determine who will represent Georgia in the Senate and which political party will control the upper chamber, turns on which party can generate enough excitement to turn their supporters out.

If today’s news conference at the International Headquarters of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference indicates which way the political wind is blowing, look for Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff to be headed to the District of Columbia. The Democratic base is excited. …


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Photo by Allec Gomes on Unsplash

Quit it! Stop it right now. I can’t bare to read or hear this hashtag one more time. It is denigrating to the southern spirit within me.

I’ve had about all I can take from people who do not live in Georgia using the hashtag “Come on Georgia” about the January 5, 2021 run-off election to fill two open seats in the US Senate. It’s as if the people of Georgia are too dumb to know what’s at stake in next week’s election.

Trust me, as peachy as it sounds, this is not a complimentary hashtag. Georgians know what they must do on the first Tuesday in 2021. Georgians realize they must get up, put their clothes and their shoes on, and hit the polls to push Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff over the top. …


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Photo by Sincerely Media on Unsplash

I tried all month to write an end of 2020 piece. The words did not flow from my brain to my fingertips with ease as in past writing sessions. I never actually got to my keyboard to put words on the computer screen until now, about 24 hours before the year expires. I am not sure if I will get through this piece this time; the words are hard to find, which expresses my emotions about the last 12 months; at least, I have begun putting words into the computer.

Last year was the first time in a decade that I did not publish a farewell and hope for a better new year piece. My social media newsfeed was the culprit. It discouraged me from writing about my thoughts in 2019 and my expectations for 2020. Every time I opened my computer, the screen was replete with comments from friends near and far, rushing 2019 into the dust bin of history and extolling the virtue of the 2020 vision that would come with the new year. …


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Photo by the author

This week, Major League Baseball integrated the record books from the segregated era of American history. The commissioner declared the exploits of Josh Gibson, Leroy Satchel Paige, Double Duty Radcliff, and others on even par with George Herman “Babe” Ruth, Walter Johnson, and Cy Young. Cliques abound: It’s about time, a long time coming, and what kept you so long, MLB?

This year marks the 100th anniversary of an organized major league for Negro baseball players. In 1920, as with other facets of American society, sports followed the Plessy v Ferguson decision. …


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Photo by Yogesh Rahamatkar on Unsplash

At the end of 2019, I set upon an ambitious course, and boldly announced I would win a book award for my memoir “Freaknik Lawyer: A Memoir on the Craft of Resistance.” I had a full schedule of speaking engagements and book signings that would take me into early summer.

On February 20, 2020, I was invited to speak on an author’s program hosted by the Washington Memorial Library in my hometown, the same library that had refused to issue a library card to me at age ten when I went in to check out a book on Willie Mays. …


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Photo by Claire Anderson on Unsplash

About the only way I can say it: The Supreme Court slammed the door in Trump’s face last week when it decided 9–0 to dismiss a complaint filed by the Attorney General of Texas against the election procedures of four other American states.

The Court shut the door so hard it ended all legal avenues for Trump’s campaign to overturn the people’s will and take the election victory away from Joe Biden and hand-deliver it to Trump.

But the Justices, three of whom had been handpicked by Trump, said loud and clear, get that mess out of here. Finally, a branch of the government stood up to Trump. If the judicial branch had cowered to Trump-like congressional Republicans- it would have been the death of American constitutional democracy as the world has known, since 1787. …

About

H. Michael Harvey

Harvey is Living Now Book Awards 2020 Bronze Medalist for his memoir Freaknik Lawyer: A Memoir on the Craft of Resistance. Available at haroldmichaelharvey.com

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